How & Why I’m Staying Away From Facebook

It’s funny really. If you announce that you’re planning on leaving Facebook for a period of time; no one really asks why. They either comment with “you’ll be back” or “congratulations”. We all know Facebook is a time-sucking, aggravation machine, and there’s really no need to question why someone would want to stay away. There’s so many reasons I’ve decided to leave the like-machine, so I’ll outline a few.

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Why?

The simple answer; People are stupid. It’s  a rough feeling constantly bothering other people through such an annoying social network but everyone’s on there all the time and convenience wins every time. We’ve had the ability to simply text each other for quite awhile now and while technology keeps becoming easier, we’ve somehow complicated communication. Something that comes as natural as opening your mouth and making noises has turned into such a headache that it’s became unappealing.

Well, I’m out to change that (for myself at least). I’m attempting to bring my life back to a simpler time when people talked to each other directly and didn’t avoid their friends based on something stupid posted on Facebook. It’s really crazy how quickly society has succumb to an addiction such as social networking.

Now, while I could go on for days with my hatred for people or the blue thumb corporation; I should be honest with you all. I still plan to use Facebook to manage my FrustratedNerd page, and until I can convert all of my friends to the idea that they’ll have to text me to talk to me, I do plan to keep Facebook’s messenger app on hand. I will be avoiding the timeline aspect of it, but it will still be there.

This isn’t one of your friend’s “I’m deactivating this crap!” normal scream for attention. I’d like to think this is bigger than that. While I’m typing up this post I have a process working in the next tab that is completely wiping my timeline. That’s right. I’m not only avoiding Facebook, I’m scraping my blue finger print off of the internet.

I still plan to use social networks, and the internet regularly. I’m just hoping that the time I usually spent on Facebook is spent somewhere more important. Maybe instead of opening an app to complain about work; I’ll open an app and be productive. Whether it’s updating this site, communicating with someone who’s too important to let me be their friend, or just making new connections through Twitter and Reddit. I’d like to believe this solution will work so let’s keep our fingers crossed.

Facebook Addict

How?

So, you’re interested in joining me on this Facebook departure? Well, I’m going to tell you now; it’s not easy. Like most addictions, cutting it out of your life is going to be a challenge. Besides the complication of cutting out something that is so normal to you now, Facebook is built to make it impossible to remove it all together.

The simple solution is to “deactivate” your profile but that will keep your entire Facebook history. Most people who aren’t ready to make the plunge into a Facebookless life or aren’t quick to make rash decisions that they will regret later will probably choose this option. It allows you to relapse and return in the exact position you left it at. Unless you’re truly committed to abandoning Facebook all together, this is the route you should go. Deactivate your account, delete the app from your smart phone and don’t look back. Make sure you replace that Facebook shortcut on your home screen. You’ll see how natural it is to unlock your phone and click that blue F soon enough.

What to go deeper? Well, there’s a Firefox extension that will automate the process of removing everything and it costs about $3, Simply search for “Facebook Remover” in the add-on store. I’m sure there’s a Chrome equivalent but I haven’t bothered to look for it yet.

Now, I have to tell you; this won’t work 100%. You won’t be able to just click it, leave it alone for a day, and be erased forever. The add-on struggles with somethings so you will have to check on it and help guide it along occasionally. This tool also will ignore tagged photos, and some of your own photos. I recommend downloading/deleting your photos by hand, because you’ll want to keep your photos. Just because a photo was on Facebook, doesn’t mean 30 year old you won’t want to take a trip down nostalgia lane.

Your second task will be to remove your tagged photos. Again, you’ll manually have to download/remove tag and depending on how many friend’s photos you’ve photo-bombed, this could take some time. Once that’s done, you’ll still have groups, pages, apps, and other random crap to remove. These shouldn’t take too much time to remove, but it could be troublesome.

I’m a heavy Facebook user, and this is becoming a 2-3 day process. While most of this is working in the background thanks to Facebook Remover, I’m getting creative with what I want to remove and how I want to leave my page for future connections that want to add me as a friend no matter how much I stress that Twitter is better.

While, this task can seem overwhelming; I believe the outcome will be worth it. Facebook has too much of our history and no one needs to know how wasted I got 5 years ago.

  • Davis Constantine

    I am the same way. After leaving, deactivating and actually not returning to Facebook, I am finding so much free time and slowly converting my friends to communicate by phone/text, face to face and even email